January Abstracts

Abstract_January_2016

Abstract_January_2016

Apologies for the wonky photograph and for the wonky artwork come to think of it. More Abstracts, this time with under painting and reveal technique. Acrylic on canvas, 7″ x 5″, available to buy at £17,000,000.48

However, I am prepared to enter into a medieval bartering type arrangement. So, if you think this painting is worth a loaf of bread then send one slice per envelope per week to my home address and I will send the painting by return post when I receive the final crust.

Please include cost of return postage, I’m not made of chuffin’ money.

Words and Pictures © D. Archer. January 2016.

Advertisements

Figurative Abstracts

Reflections

Reflections

I don’t dream. I put this down to the prolonged period of insomnia that I suffered after my divorce, however, I have recently been waking up with fragments of an image that has coincided with my rekindled interest in painting.

I’m colour blind; good old fashioned Red / Green combo and this has always been a crutch to stop myself from painting. Who wants a violet sky and magenta grass? Well it turns out that plenty of people do provided the piece is well executed and within an abstract framework, and there lies the dilemma.

Painting abstracts, to me, is not about “Not being able to paint properly” or “Not having studied for X years at Art School”, it is primarily concerned with expression and partly about technique; the proportions of these two factors is what divides the opinion. I suppose the “Expression ‘v’ Technique” debate is the art world equivalent of the chicken and the egg scenario.

We live in an existential world, trees grow upwards, grass is green, sky is on top etc. To challenge these representations (visually) means to think and to think is a powerful life skill.

It is said as humans we use only 10% of our brain’s capacity and the average time spent looking at artwork in a gallery is less than 30 seconds and in that 30 seconds we make broad sweeping generalisations not only about the piece “Doesn’t look like a tree” but also about the artist “My kid could do that” so may I suggest that if your child can emote like Jackson Pollock then nurture and treasure that child beyond your earthly years for they have that rare and precious gift of independent thought.

My artwork is my own, through my eyes, echoes of my past and shaped by my hand. If this piece progresses my painterly technique that’s a bonus; If it strikes a chord with another human well that’s much better but if it hangs on my wall and engages my thoughts every time I look at it then it has achieved it’s purpose.

Abstracts are about painting the emotion not the object. If you want a picture, take a photograph.

Words and Pictures © D. Archer. December 2015

Rembrandt Van Rijn

Not many people know this but before Rembrandt Van Rijn was famous for his matchstick men and women paintings he had a nice little earner producing saucy seaside postcards.

In the olden days the pancreas was thought to be where orgasms came from.

Most people couldn’t afford to have a portrait of themselves done for Christmas or to put on a tea-towel or a mug so they would go down to the harbour and wait for Rembrandt to sail past in his boat. Rembrandt would shout out the names of famous footballers (or Soccer players if the peasants looked American) and if the person on the dockside could make a rude anagram out of the name then Rembrandt would come ashore and paint them for free.

In 1985 when Rembrandt died it was estimated that he had been dead for a lot longer.

Rembrandt loved to paint cars and in his spare time he would go to the local car park and tip paint all over the cars that were parked in the disabled bays without a blue badge.

Rembrandt was also the name of my first cat but he couldn’t paint at all he just looked at me funny when I took my trousers off.

I miss that cat.

In 1986 Rembrandt (the artist, not my cat) was still dead. My cat, Rembrandt, strangely enough died in 1987. I didn’t wear any trousers for a whole year as a mark of respect.

I spent 1988 in prison for  indecent exposure and it was whilst in Prison that I learned that Rembrandt (the artist, not my cat) was also a great saxophone player and even had a chance to record an album with David Hasselhoff (HasselHoff translated directly from the German/Austrian/Bulgarian dialect actually means “Shrunken-Sperm”). 

It was also around this time I was admitted to hospital for what was to be the first of many psychotic episodes. They told me that everything would be OK if I just kept taking my tablets and never ever started a blog on the internet.

Are you still reading this?

Words © D. Archer. Pictures by RVJ.

Abstracts

I’ve re-connected with my interest in abstract art. These are acrylics on canvas. The Midnight Trees has an under painting done in masking fluid and so it catches the light from various angles, quite unintentional I assure you.

Words and dodgy photographs © D. Archer . December 2015.

Adventures of my imaginary cat

Here is a collection of photographs of my imaginary cat Alan and his two friends Hector and Chester. These photographs were taken shortly before they went on their holidays. They were not pleased at being made to sit still, not pleased at all.

© D. Archer. October 2015.

Art Therapy for Manic Depressives

art_therapy_1

I have noticed on my travels that a current trend is to sell 72dpi line art drawings under the vaguely disguised medium of “Art Therapy”. Never the one the miss a money-making opportunity I have decided to create 8,764 images aimed squarely at the growing medicated market. Here is number 1 in the series.

The rules are simple. You will need a black marker pen, the rest (if you’re not too depressed to finish it) can take as long as you like.

Here’s a clue to get you started “1 = Black”.

You may have noticed that some of the areas have more than one number in them, this is where I want you to pay extra attention and really layer on that colour.
(If you don’t have a black pen I suggest you wait until the voices stop screaming and then write a poem or a song instead. Listen to some Leonard Cohen albums for ideas!)

Once finished you will have gained a valuable insight into the mind of a manic depressive artist.

Remember not to stray outside the lines or you’ll spoil everything and no one, not even your mum, will want to put it on their fridge.

© D. Archer. October 2015